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Vol. 1. (WITH ALL SORTS OF EKQRAVIffGS.) UTo. ©. 




ELTON Publisher, 

107 John, near Pearl st. & 1§ division Street, 
NEW-YORK. 

Stereotyped by Vincent L. Dill. 128 Fulton St root. New- York. 



CUSTOMARY NOTES. 

I. YYnus (£>) will be Morning Star until March 5th, then Evening 
Star until December 18th, then Morning Star until October 2d, 1843. 

'2. The Moon will run highest this year about the 20th degree of Ge- 
mini, (H) and lowest about the 20th degree of ( J ) Sagittarius. 

3. Latitude of Ilerschel (J#) 45' 27" south in the middle of this year. 

4. Longitude of the Moon's Ascending Node, (g) in the middle of this 
year, II signs, 21 degrees. 

5. Mean obliquity of the Ecliptic in the middle of this year,23° 27' 35.4". 
True obliquity, same time, 23° 27 / 38.3". 

PRINCIPAL ARTICLES: 

MOVEABLE FEASTS. 

Easter Sunday, March 27 

Rogation Sunday, May J 

Ascension Day, May 5 

Whitsunday, May 15 

Trinity Sunday, May 22 

Advent Sunday, November 27 



CHRONOLOGICAL 


CYCLES. 


Dominical Letter, 


B 


Golden Number, 


19 


Enact, 


18 


Solar Cycle, 


3 


Roman Indiction, 


15 


Julian Period, 


6555 



EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 

D. H. M. 

Vernal Equinox, March 20 7 17 Evening. 

Summer Solstice, June 21 4 26 Evening. 

Autumnal Equinox, September 23 6 30 Morning. 
Winter Solstice, December 21 11 59 Evening. 

Note. — The rising and setting of the Sun are given in apparent time» 
in this Almanac. All the other calculations are in clock time. 

ECLIPSES IN THE YEAR 1842. 

There will be five Eclipses this year ; three of the Sun and two of the Moon. 

I. There will be an Eclipse of the Sun on the 11th of January, at llh. 19m. in 
the morning, invisible in America except about Cape Horn. 

This Eclipse will be annular at the South Pole, and will be visible in the sur- 
rounding dreary regions for fifteen hundred miles in every direction. At the 
Cape of Good Hope and at Cape Horn, an Eclipse may be seen on the Sun's 
southern limb. Magnitude at the former place, 8. 98. digits. The Eclipse will 
be central and annular on the meridian in longitude 57° 28' west from Green- 
wich, and latitude 88o 41' south. 

II. There will be an Eclipse of the Moon on the 26th of January, at Oh. 54m. 
in the afternoon, consequently invisible to us. 

III. There will be an Eclipse of the Sun on the 8th of July, at 2h. 5m. in 
the morning, invisible here. This Eclipse will pass central and total through 
Europe and Asia. It will be visible in every part of Europe, and in almost 
every part of Asia. It will be visible also in Greenland, in Egypt, and in the 
Island of Borneo. It will be central and total on the meridian in longitude 77o 
27' east from Greenwich, and latitude 51o 47' north. 

C Greenwich, 9 61 ) 
Magnitude at< Edinburgh, 8 24 > digits on the Sun's southern limb. 
( Dublin, 8 53 ) 

IV. There will be an Eclipse of the Moon on the 22d of July, at 6h. lm. in 
the morning, invisible. The Moon will set at New- York about two minutes 
before the beginning of the Eclipse. At Natchez this Eclipse will be chiefly 
visible. 

V. There will be an Eclipse of the Sun on the 31st of December, at 2h. 6m. 
in the afternoon, invisible to us. 

This Eclipse will be visible throughout South America, and in the surround- 
ing waters, including most of the South Pacific Ocean, and a part of the Great 
Southern Ocean, extending to 72o of south latitude. The central Eclipse (which 
will be annular)' will commence near Tongataboo, among the Friendly Islands, 
and sweeping a southern curve while it passes to the eastward, will strike the 
continent nearly in the same latitude. It will pass through South America 
from near Arequipa, crossing the southern branches of the Amazon, to the At- 
lantic near the mouth of that River ; and will leave the earth at a point three 
and a half miles north of the Equator in longitude 42o 55' west from Greenwich. 



1. JANUARY. 



Begins on Saturday, 31 days. 



1§42. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

D. II. M. 

Third Quarter, 3 5 12 E. 

New Moon, 11 11 19 M. 

First Q-uarter, 19 4 4 E. 

Full Moon, 26 54 E. 



s3 s 

S3 *-• 



Days. 



2 


B 


5 


2 


4 


3 


5 


4 


G 


5 


7 


6 


8 


'i 


9 


B 


10 


2 


11 


3 


12 


4 


13 


5 


14 


6 


15 


7 


16 


B 


1? 


2 


18 


3 


19 


4 


20 


5 


21 


6 


22 


7 


23 


B 


24 


2 


25 


3 


20 


1 


27 


5 


28 


6 


29 


7 


30 


B 


31 


2 



Various Phenomena. 



Fair. 



Circumcision. 

2dS. after Christmas. 

Rain 
Sirius south 11 41. 
J* sets 8 26. 
Epiphany. i 

Aldebaran sets £ 21. 
<§) runs low. c5 9 % 
1st Sunday after Epiphany. 
Rough winds. 
Dr. Dwight died 1817. 
© 8- Look for 

% in apogee. 

Ell-and-yard south 9 48. 

2d Sunday after Epiphany. 

Sup. 6 €> 5- Frank, b. 1706 
More 
snow. 

® ent. %Z. Fabian. 

Agnes. Severe 

Vincent. winds. 

Septuages. ® runs high. 
Look for a 

Conv. of St. Paul. 

in perigee. <f) ?$. 

snow storm. 

Peter the great died 1725. 

Sirius sets 3 9. 

Sexagesima. 

Sirius south 9 54. 



Ri. 

H. M. 



26 4 





Sets 



® 

dec.S 



34 23 

35 22 55 
22 50 

22 48 
22 3' 
22 30 
22 22 
22 14 
22 6 
21 5' 
21 48 
21 38 
21 28 
21 17 
21 7 
20 55 
20 43 
20 31 
20 19 
20 6 
19 53 
19 39 
19 25 
19 11 
18 56 
18 41 
18 26 
18 10 
17 54 
17 38 
17 21 



pla 



Rises 

H. M. 



10 24 

11 36 
morn 

46 



6 51 

sets, 

5 58 

6 59 

7 59 

8 59 

9 58 
10 59 
morn 

1 

1 6 

2 14 

3 23 

4 30 

5 31 

6 23 
rises. 

6 44 

8 2 

9 18 

10 31 

11 43 



Sou. 



3 48 

4 38 

5 26 

6 13 

7 2 

7 52 

8 44 

9 37 

10 30 

11 21 
ev. 10 

5' 



41 
22 

2 
42 
23 

5 
50 

6 39 

7 33 

8 32 

9 34 

10 38 

11 41 
morn 

40 

1 35 

2 27 

3 18 

4 8 



High 
water 

H. M. 



11 46 
ev.32 



15 
3 

49 

58 
22 
44 
44 



8 30 

9 7 
9 45 

10 17 

10 50 

11 21 
11 53 
morn 

24 

59 

1 37 

2 17 

3 20 

4 44 

6 11 

7 21 

8 19 

9 13 
9 59 

10 42 

11 25 
ev. 5 




H s ppy New ITear* 




Ziime Juice. 



" I say, Barney, is this the lime-juice that they puts in the ladies' 
drinks?" 
"I'facks I think if it is, it must be a very hodd affair." 
" It must be like soda, as it 'as fixed 'air in it." 

Thrice three times have we now made an assault upon the risibles of 
community, and thrice three times will the world have responded, in 
wide-mouthed and stentorian echoes, when our present essay shall have 
gone forth. This imposing volume is intended to be a reg'lar rib- 
shaker, a purifier of the mental atmosphere, a disentangler of the woof 
and warp of care's dull web, a scientific conglomeration of mouth- 
wreathing crudities, and a gathering of sparkles on the superfices of 
the wine of literature. That is the climax of our observations : if we 
should say another word, we should feel uncomfortable. 

Why is the wire that keeps 
down the cork, like a toper ? 

Ans. — Because it remains 
a long time over the bottle. 



A violent fever. — One of the 
inmates of a lunatic asylum 
is said to have described the 
severity of his disease, and 
the consequences, in the fol- 
lowing emphatic language: 
" The cold stage was so vio- 
lent as to shake off the plas- 
tering of the room ; the hot 
stage so intense that the lath 
took fire, and he should cer- 
tainly heve perished in the 




"Take a little more." 
" Well, one DROP since yon In- 
sist on it." 



flames, had not the profuse perspiration which followed, extinguished 
the fire, and saved himself and the house from entire destruction." 

Ail are not saints who go to church. 




n If I finds my wife up, Joe, I'll lick her for (hie) burning (hie) fire 
and candles, and (hie) if I (hie) cotch her (hie) abed, I'll lick her cos 
she aint (hie) no busness to (hie) go to bed before I comes home." 

" So'll I, Bill." 



Two gentlemen of sport meeting in the street one rainy night, en- 
countered each other with such force that both were knocked down by 
the concussion. They drew their swords and came at each other with 
all the fury that honor and whiskey punch could inspire; but at every 
pass they staggered wide of the mark, and pierced the innocent atmos- 
phere. At last, wearied with this sport, they passed on, each one swear- 
ing that the other was a coward, and would not stand still long enough 
to be killed. 



■ Daddy, what is 
a civil war 1" 

" 'Tendtoyered- 
dication, child, and 
yer'll find out. It is 
"where the cannon 
balls are kivvered 
with velvet cush- 
ions, and the swords 
are greased with 
ointment ; so when 
the balls hits one it 
don't hurt 'em, and 
when one is stuck 
with a sword, it 
heals right up a- 
gin." 

" Yes, daddy — cos 
the sword carries 
the pison and the 
anecdote all in one 
like." 

" 'Zackly so, my 
child ; and ven they 
fights a duel in the 
civil war fashion, 
they sees that the 
civil authorities is 
on the ground be- 
fore they begins." 




Civil War. 



An old lady who was 
hard of hearing, being tried 
for theft, was sentenced to 
the house of correction. — 
Not hearing the words of 
the judge, she made a low 
courtesy and says, " thank 
you sir." " What !" cries 
the judge, " do you mean 
contempt of court V 9 

11 If you please, sir," re- 
plied she with the same po- 
lite genefluxion. 

" She must be a hardened 
offender, and doubtless re- 
ceives the attentions of pro- 
fligate men," said the judge. 

" Just as your honour 
pleases," said the woman, 
with a bow. 




Babes in the Wood. 



Light of other days. — In the days of the blue laws of New England, a 
shoemaker was condemned to be hanged for something he had done ; 
but, on the day appointed for his execution, they discovered that he 
was the only shoemaker in the place ; so they hanged a weaver in his 
stead ; for they had more weavers than they knew what to do with. 

11 Warm weather in this climate," as the spider said when he fell in the 
ashes. 




SARAH, the great African Desert. 




" Sambo, do you 
know dat colored la- 
dy ?" 

" Yes Caesar, tink 
I do. Wind and wed- 
derpermittin,sheand 
dis nigger will be one 
flesh before de nex 
Christ mas." 

" Whew! Sambo, 
den you will hab a 
great addition to your 
copporossity." 



STBP-father. 



Mr. Straddlebug wished to teach them 
patrimony at interest, while they wore out 
the charity school. In the meantime the 
dlebug straddled across the Atlantic Ocea 
money in his pockets, and could never end 
again, as they reminded him of his loss. 



Captain Ebenezer 
Straddlcbug married 
Mrs. Weather wist' 
out of tenderness to 
— her orphan children, 
and in the belief lha 
a man could lay out 
the ten thousand dol- 
ars which their la- 
ther left them, to bet- 
ter advantage than an 

unprotected woman. 

economy, and put out their 
their old clothes and went to 
mother died, and Mr. Strad- 
n for his health, with all the 
ure to see one of the children 



Charily. — Unlacing a young lady's corset to enable her to sneeze. 



Hallo ! what's all dis about? 
" De rose is red, de violet blue, 
De Debbil's black and so are y&u." 
Well, dat's berry fair indeed ! 




The Valentine. 



11 Miss Rosa, shall I hab de pleasure to tend church wid you dis arter- 
noon, and carry your parasol for you ?" " Go along, nigger, you is as 
sassy as white folks." 

The king of Congo causes himself to be whitewashed when he goes a 
journey, because black attracts the sun. 

A youngster desirous of obtaining a night's lodging on the credit of 
his parentage, rubbed himself down with hogs' fat, and endeavored to 
pass himself off as Sam Slick's oldest boy. 

A gentleman of this city has made application to the Abolition Society, 
with some hopes of success, for a reward for a patent that he has re- 
cently invented for straightening negro's wool. 



E FEEEUAEf. Begins on Tuesday, 28 days. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES, 

B. II. M. 

Third Ctuarter, 2 5 30 M. 

New Moon, 10 6 58 M. 

First auarter, 18 6 45 M. 

Fall Moon, 24 11 19 E. 



f • A 


r- 


rM 


re 


PQ 


O 


>~ 


'- "" 




kT3 


^4 


CO 


OQ 


SSI 


kfl 


01 
















Sun 
Merid 

H. M 


ro 


-* 


^ 


■** 


■^ 


5* 


& 


r— i 
o 


© 


O 


© 


© 


Q 

s 


© 


Days. 




3. MARCH. 



Begins on Tuesday, 31 days. 



1842. 



D. H. M. 

Third Quarter, 3 8 2G E. 

New Moon, 12 1 33 M. 

First Quarter, 19 5 46 E. 

Full Moon, 26 9 1 M. 



o.2 • 

02^ J 



Days. 



iO 



to ^ 

o © 



Ci CO 



i> I CO 



CM C* 



Various Phenomena. 



I 


B 


* 


2 


6 


3 


9 


4 


H 


5 


11 


6 


12 


7 


13 


B 


11 


2 


16 


3 


10 


4 


17 


5 


lb 


6 


19 


7 


•20 


B 


21 


2 


22 


3 


23 


4 


24 


5 


25 


6 


26 


7 


2? 


B 


28 


2 


29 


3 


30 


4 


31 


51 



Ri. I Setc 

II. M.jH. M 



3 ! St. David. Cold 

4 J. Wesley died 1791. 

5 Inferior 6 <2) 5- con " 
6(f) runs low. tin%es. 

Superior 6 O 9- 

Mid. Lent. Snow 

® S2- ^ r ****»• 

Regulus sou. 10 54. 
® in apogee. 
^ rises 3 24. 

High winds. 
Martyr Gregory. 6 

$ discovered 1781. 6 

Turbulent. 6 
d $• 5 stat - Jackson G 
[born 1707. 6 
St. Patrick. r<m- 6 

Regulus sou. 10 15. G 

4D runs high. #£te. 6 

© ent. °k°. Palm Sunday. 
Benedict. f) g. 5 

Ceylon mis. est. 1814. 5 

*l rises 2 16. 5 

in perigee. Look 5 

Good Friday. Annun. B. 5 
/<?r rain. [V. M. 5 
Easter Sunday. 5 

C.Wesley died 1788. 5 

7). rises 2 19. 5 

5 's gr. elongation. 
f) runs low. OZd 



G 2G 

G 25 

G 24 

G 22 

6 21 

G 19 

6 18 

6 17 

6 15 

14 

13 

11 

10 

9 



dec.S 



7 32 



10 
4" 
21 

37 
14 
51 
2' 
4 
40 
1G 
2 53 
2 29 
2 G 
1 42 
1 18 
54 
31 
S. 7 



pla 



in. r 



40 

1 4 

28 
51 
15 
38 
2 
25 
48 
11 



20 

t 
22 

n; 

28 

AW 

21 

15 

27 

T 
22 

8 
17 
30 

n 

2G 

52 
24 

& 

23 

-TV 

23 

m 

21 

I 

17 



Rises Sou. 

H. M. H. M 



11 4G 

morn 

54 

1 54 

2 4G 

3 30 

4 6 

4 37 

5 3 
5 2(5 
5 48 
sets. 

7 45 

8 4s 

9 53 
10 59 
morn 

4 

1 

2 

2 

3 

4 

4 

5 



3 39 

4 3* 

5 2G 

6 20 

7 13 

8 4 

8 52 

9 37 

10 20 

11 1 
11 41 
ev.2l 



1 
40 
20 

3 
34 

2 
rises. 

8 9 

9 23 

10 35 

11 40 
morn 



8 5 

9 1 
9 55 

10 4' 

11 39 
morn 

31 

1 24 

2 18 

3 14 

4 10 



High 
water 

H. M. 

11 39 
ev. 1G 

59 

1 47 

2 47 

4 14 

5 39 
G 53 

7 51 

8 28 

9 
9 31 
9 53 

10 2G 

10 55 

11 28 
morn 

3 

43 

1 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

9 



32 
35 
8 
40 
54 
46 
32 
15 
5G 

10 37 

11 18 
11 57 




Windy March. 



"Sam 
evening T 



, ar you gwoin to heah that gemman of color preach dis 

( 



" No 'deed. I leff off 
gwoin to darkey meetin' 
sense I set up de boot- 
black bizness. I 'tend 
de white meetin' all to- 
geddei*." 




" Cloudy weather, sir.'' 

* 4 Very, sir." 

" I hope you may be a 
king." 

" How so f" 

11 Because, sir, where 
there is so dark a cloud, 
there must be a long 
reign" — (rain.) 

" I hope you guard the 
palace faithfully." 

" That I do, and when- 
ever any intruder ap- 
proaches, I look black as 
thunder at him." 

11 I hope you never re- 
veal the king's secrets." 

11 Oh no, 1 always keep 
dark." 



pair of black-GU ARD3. 



" Too much of a good 
thing" — as the lady said 
when she was introduced 
to the Candy-Man. 



11 Ah, Pompey, is dat you — glad to see you. De sight ob you is good 
for sore eyes/' - Yes, nigger, vou 

war always fond of 
pokin on de dark side 
of ebcry ting." 




Getting 1 out of Pigtail. 



What kind of a 
glass hurts the eyes 
most 1 — A glass of 
brandy. 



''Miss Phillis, hab you heard de new weddin son?, made a proppos 
for you and me wen we is married and made two in one V 
11 No, Sambo, how duz it go ?" 
M Why dis heah way : — 

1 1 see two cloud de zephyr move along 
Until dey meet and mingle into one.' " 



Selling for cash. — "Hallo, George!" bawled an awkward, rum- 
sucking six-footer the other day, to a boon companion, " I've sold Bull " 
" The deuce you have 1" replied George. " Yes, I sold him for sixty 
dollars." " Whew ! 'spose you'll be able to treat on the head o( it ?" 
" No, I didn't jist exactly sell for cash, but I got two other dogs in ex- 
change, which is the same thing as cash, you know." 




" Here, Joe, unhook my dress. I wants to sne-e-e-ze — hush-oh !" 
11 Hold hard, miss : blow'd if you wont bu'st all the 'ooks and hize 
off, if you sneezes.'' 

" I should think you would feel small to be employed so," said a 
moral reform agent when he caught a young lady lacing herself. 
" That's the very thing I am trying to do," said she. 



Musquitoes. — Let a man go to sleep with his head in a cast iron ket- 
tle, among them " critters," and their bills will make a watering-pot of 
it before the next morning. 



4< 


► APJR.11^. Begins on Friday, 


30 days. 








1842. 




' Cfl 


r*-i»Q.j*- 


CQ 




DO 


OS 0* 


ro 


mOOWB FBASS& 


g g 


in rt< co 


CO 


bfl 


CO 


CO 


L.O 




D. H. M. 


5 S 


CO G* »H 


© 


*5 


21 


X 






Third auarter, 2 1 34 E. . 


5 » • 



















New Moon, 10 5 35 E. 


o © [o 


© 


§ 


r^ 


2 


I-H 


— 


First auarter, 18 1 36 M. 
Pull Moon, 24 6 31 E. 




















Days. 


i-H *D O 


c*a 




F» 


o5 


O* 


35 








® 


# 


[®'s 


f) 


® 


@ 


High 


D 


i>. 


Various Phenomena. 


Ri. 


Sets. 


dec.N 


pla. 


Rises 


South 


water 


M. 


w. 




H. M 


H. M, 


O f 




H. M. 


H. 


M. 


H. M. 


1 


6 


Like far rain. 


5 4' 


16 16 


4 35 


1 


37 


5 


5 


ev.39 


2 


7 


Jefferson born 1743. 


5 4; 


5 6 17 


4 58 


V5 


1 25 


5 57 


1 25 


3 


3 


Low Sunday. ® &. 


5 4$ 


36 18 


5 21 


24 


2 5 


6 47 


2 20 


4 


2 


St. Ambrose. Q ® h- 


5 4( 


)6 20 


5 44 


M*/ 


2 38 


7 33 


3 34 


5 


3 


® in apogee. /?«?/? 


5 3< 


)6 21 


6 6 


18 


3 5 


8 17 


5 2 


6 


4 


e#M winds. 


5 3t 


}6 22 


6 29 


30 


3 30 


8 58 


6 15 


7 


5 


Regulus sou. 8 56. 


5 3( 


>6 24 


6 52 


K 


3 52 


9 39 


7 11 


8 


6 


% rises 1 44. 


5 3f 


>6 25 


7 14 


24 


4 13 


10 19 


7 56 


9 


7 


Variable 


5 34 


6 26 


7 37 


T 


4 35 


11 


8 24 


10 


B 


2d Sunday after Easter. 


5 3S 


6 28 


7 59 


18 


sets. 


11 43 


8 55 


11 


2 


0®%- weather. 


5 31 


6 29 


8 21 


« 


7 44 


ev.28 


9 25 


12 


3 


Arcturus sou. 48. 


5 3C 


6 30 


8 43 


14 


8 50 


1 17 


9 57 


13 


4 


Spica ttfcsou. 11. 49. 


5 2g 


6 32 


9 5 


27 


9 56 


2 9 


10 30 


14 


5 


% rises 1 23. 


5 27 


6 33 


9 26 


n 


10 59 


3 5 


11 9 


15 


6 


® runs high. 


5 26 


6 34 


9 48 


23 


11 56 


4 3 


11 46 


16 


7 


Cold and 


5 25 


6 35 


10 9 


53 


morn 


5 1 


morn 


17 


B 


Franklin died 1790. (§ g. 


5 23 


6 37 


10 30 


20 


46 


5 58 


31 


18 


2 


backward. 


5 22 


6 38 


10 51 


SI 


1 27 


6 53 


1 26 


19 


3 


Lexington battle 1775. 


5 21 


6 39 


11 12 


19 


2 3 


7 46 


2 31 


20 


4 


® enters $. 


5 19 


6 41 


11 33 


i£ 


2 33 


8 37 


3 58 


21 


5 


® in perigee. 


5 18 


6 42 


11 53 


17 


3 1 


9 27 


5 17 


22 


6 


Unsettled. 


5 17 


(5 43 


12 13 


_n. 


3 29 


10 18 


6 96 


23 


7 


St. George, h stat. 


5 16 


6 44 


12 33 


17 


3 56 


11 9 


7 18 


24 


B 


4th Sunday after Easter. 


5 15 


6 45 


12 53 


m 


rises. 


mom 


8 io 


25 


2 


St. Mark. Look 


5 13 


6 47 


13 13 


15 


8 11 


3 


8 54 


26 


3 


for wet 


5 12 


6 48 


13 32 


29 


9 21 


58 


9 34 


27 


4 


weather. 


5 11 


6 49 


L3 51 


t 


10 23 


1 55 


io L8 


28 


5 


§) runs low. 


5 10 


6 50 


14 10 


25 


11 16 


2 52 


10 58 


29 


6 


Arcturus south 11 37. 5 9 


6 51 


14 29 


yj 


12 


3 46 


11 38 


301 


7 


§) §?. More f air. \ 


3 7 


6 53 


L4 48 


20 


morn 


4 


W 


2V. 1 


6 




April Foci. 



5. MAY. 



Begins on Sunday, 31 days. 



1§44. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter, 
New Moon, 
First Gluarter, 
Full Moon, 



2 
10 
17 

24 



50 M. 

42 M. 
14 M. 

43 M. 






Days. 



iT5 



1 

2 


B 

2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 





(i 


7 


7 


8 


B 


( J 


2 


10 


3 


11 


1 


12 


5 


13 


6 


14 


7 


15 


B 


16 


2 


17 


3 


18 


4 


1!) 


5 


20 


6 


21 


7 


22 


B 


23 


2 


21 


3 


25 


1 


26 


5 


27 


6 


2* 


7 


29 


B 


30 


2 


31 


3 



Various Phenomena. 



Rogation. Sts. Philip and 
Cloudy [James 
Inv. of the Cross. <D in ap 
ami cool. 
Ascension. 
St, John Evangelist. 
h rises 11 18. 
Sunday after Ascension 

More pleasant. 
Sup. 6 ® 5- r 4stat. 
Am. Tr. S. anniversary. 
A. B. Soc. ann. <$) r. high 
Very 
<UD J§. pleasant. 

Whit Sunday, 
f^ south 3 26. 
Spica Tl£ sou. 9 35. 
~ in perigee. Warm 

Gen. Assem. P. Ch. 
La Fayette died 1834. 
© enters JJ- showers .' 

Trinity Sunday. 

Spring advances. 
Gtueen Victoria born 1819. 

runs low. 
Calvin died 1564. 
Venerable Bede. © $. 
F2 south 2 37. 
1st Sunday after Trinity. 
2 sets 9 9. More, 

J) in apogee. showers., 





Ri. 

H. M. 



Sets 

II. M. 



6 54 

6 55 
6 56 
6 5' 

6 58 
6 59; 



dec.N 



pla. 



1320 



Rises 

H. M. 



3G 
1 



6 
3-2 
55 
16 
3S 

1 
26 
54 ; 
sets 

8 50 

9 50 

10 43 

11 27 
morn: 

4j 

36 

1 4 
1 31 3 

1 57 

2 26 

2 5' 

3 34 
rise; 

9 5 
9 53 

10 32 

11 5 
11 33 
11 57 
morn 



Sou 

H. M 



High 
water 

H. M. 

5 27 1 

6 12| 1 49 
2 55 

4 5 

5 12 

6 14 

7 3 

7 40 

8 17 

8 54 

9 33 
10 12 

10 55 

11 39 
morn 

26 

1 23 

2 24 

3 35 

4 49 

5 57 

6 52 

7 45 

8 35 

9 20 
9 59 

10 39 

11 17 
11 54 
ev.37 



6 54 

7 35 

8 15 

8 56 

9 38 

10 23 

11 11 
ev. 2 

58 

1 56 

2 56 

3 54 

4 50 

5 43 

6 33 

7 22 

8 11 

9 1 
9 52 

10 4< 

11 4! 
morn 

38 

1 34. 

2 28 

3 18 

4 5 
4 49 



5 31 1 20 




Hent Etey. 




Playing 1 at Hazard. 



" Play upon the crowd," 
said a roguish boss to his 
eldest apprentice, who 
held the pipe of a fancy 
engine during a trial of 
skill in the Park. 

The young man obey- 
ed, but so faithfully that 
he nearly drowned the 
by-standers, and among 
the rest his master. The 
latter deprecated this act, 
but the apprentice replied, 
" You have often told me 
that when I do a thing at 
all, I should do it well." 

The printer of the 
Western Gazette lately 
published the following 
notice : " Dry stove wood 
wanted immediately at 
this office in exchange for 
papers. N. B. Dont bring 
logs that the devil can't 
split. 

" I'm dished" — as the 
codfish said to the cook. 



" Oh, Lord-a-massy ! 
my dear man, I am 
left , and I'm sure that 
aint right. I am down, 
and wish you would 
hold up." 



" The wisest men al- 
ways think themselves 
the most ignorant." 

" Do they, daddy 1 
and was Dr. Johnson a 
wise man ?" 

" Certainly, why do 
you ask ?" 

" Because if he tho't 
himself the most igno- 
rant man, he must 
have had good spunk 
to set about making a 
dictionary." 

What makes more 
noise under a barn- 
gate than a pig 1 Do 
you give it up 1 — Two 
pigs. Go it piggies ! 




Set down ONH and CARRY ONE. 

DABOL. 



" Where are my stays," asked a lady of her husband. " Here they 
are," said he, throwing his arms around her. 



" My eyes ! the greatest travellers and scientifics has never been 
able to find the source of that plaguy Niger; and when Mungo Park 
found it, he was 
kilt by the natives, 
and it never will be 
found out unless 
some thing new 
should turn up-^ 
Blood and fury ! 
child, you've turned 
up the inkstand !" 

11 No, daddy, it's 
only the river over- 
flowing its banks — 
quite customary in 
Africa, I assure 
you." 

" Well, child— r 
right or wrong — UJIj 
there is some color * 
in your theory !" 



A long word. — A 
physician's adver- 
tisement in the St. 
Louis Repub., of a 
column in length, "is 
headed " one word, 
as to this climate." 




Discovering: the source of the Niger. 




" Tails up, I 
win," as the horse 
said when he threw 
his rider. 

" Have you any 
children 1" said a 
judge to a woman 
who had recently 
been let out of the 
house of correction. 

" You need not 
ask that, sir, when 
you knows I ar 
lately ben con- 
fined." 



A Highland Fling 1 . 



11 Teeth insert- 
ed," as the bull dog 
said when he bit 
the man. 



Black Hawk's son. — A party of ladies and gentlemen were looking 
at a gallery of Indian portraits, when the likeness of Black Hawk, his 
son, and the prophet, were exhibited to their notice. A young lady 
was pleased with the face of the junior warrior, and inquired his name. 
The exhibitor could only assure her that he had always been called 
Black Hawk's Son, and never had any other name. " Why," said a 
was:, " he must be the famous Tommy Hawk — I have often heard that 
name in connection with Indian matters. 




Falling 1 IN with a friend. 



11 Let go my 

toe, I tell you. 
Is it any reason 
that 1 should be 
drowned bekase 
you areV* 

" Oh murder! 
are you goin* to 
desart a friend 
bekase he's got 
into trouble r 

M Show proper 
respect to dem 
as are above 
you," as the 
sweep at the 
chimney top 
said to the boys 
in the street. 

Why is the 
sun like a lump 
of dough 1 Do 
you give it up 1 
Because it rises 
in the yeast — 
(east.) 



A report having been circulated that the devil was dead, a down 
east editor dressed his paper in mourning — not, he said, on account of 
any peculiar re- 
spect for the pri- 
vate character 
of the deceased; 
but because it 
was customary 
thus to notice 
the demise of 

all distinguished mV 1\\\ \\; *3L 7/ 

personages. 




The best case 
of absence of 
mind was that 
of a man who, 
in firing off a 
bomb, placed the 
shell on the 
ground, seated 

himself in the Blowing" np the devil 

mortar and touched it off. He did not discover his mistake until 
riving in the enemy's fort, he tried to burst. 



, on ar- 



Ckanging the tune. — " Run and get me an armful of wood," said a 
woman to her husband, one rainy day, " as you are wet and I am dry." 
The same plea was used for a dozen more errands. At last it was 
"Get me a bucket of water, for you are wet and I am dry." The 
bucket of water was brought and thrown over her, the husband exclaim- 
ing, " Now do your share, for you are wet too." 



11 Tray, Tray ! down 
you sarpent ! don't 
bark at the gen'leman. 
You'll excuse him, 
sir, he*s taken to wrong 
courses lately ; but 
pray, sir, will the gen- 
'leman be good enough o\\\\S 
to tell me how far it is H^ 
to the BulVs Head ? I 
think I can't be far 
off. Pse in a hurry to 
get there, as the wea- \ 
ther is hot and I wants * 
to take a couple of 
horns. 

" What sort of a 
day's work have you 
made of it," asked a 
chap of his companion. 
" Awfully equal ! I've 
lost my handkerchief, 
and stole a knife." 




A misled Man. 



To hang 1 or not to hang:— That is the question. 

" Come, sir ; they 
says there's no re- 
prieve for you, arter 
all the petitionings. 
You'd better take it 
kindly, you knows." 

11 No reprieve, d'ye 
say 1 why that's noose 
to me !" 




A legal tender. 



Cure for love. — Be- 
think yourself that 
there are men in the 
world who are wiser 
than you are, and they 
would not suppose 
your sweetheart an 
angel, nor fall in love 
with her. Think then 
how unreasonable you 
Indeed, how dare you 



are in differing in opinion with your betters ! 

pretend to know better than the whole world, since no one but yourself 

thinks of her as you do. 



Military Pride. — An honest old Dutch farmer, in the interior of 
Pennsylvania, was elected corporal in a militia company. His wife, 
after discoursing with him for some time on the advantages which the 
family would derive from his exaltation, inquired in a doubting tone, 
" I guess it won't be proper for us to let our clildren play with the neigh- 
bours' now 1" One of the little urchins eagerly asked, " Are we not 
all corporals V } " Hold your tongue," said the mother, " there is no 
one corporal but your father and myself." 




11 Its rather tick- 
lish travelling, but 
I think I shall be 
able to pick my way 
up." 

" Eh ! you con- 
founded villain, Pre 
got something here 
that will pick your 
way down.'' 

" I suppose the 
old put will be made 
because I didn't ax 
him." 

iC Oh, you blas- 
phemer ! but VWaxc 
you though." 



An anti-climax. 



must have been some other gentleman : for 
sooner plunge from the top of JEtna's burning 
lava's deadly surge, 
than to put a finger's 
weight upon the sacred 
reputation of woman ! 
Besides, gentlemen of 
the jury, the lady never 
had any character — 
how, then, could I in- 
jure ill 



Eloquent Defence. 
I am charged 
w T ith injuring this 
young lady's cha- 
racter. Now, gen- 
tlemen of the jurv, 
it is impossible. By 
all the manes of 
chivalry — by the 
ghosts of my noble 
ancestors, I never 
could stoop so low 
as to sully the vir- 
gin purity of a ln- 
— dy's reputation. It 
I tell you that I would 
crater into the foaming 




A young lady, about 
to sue for a breach of 
promise, placed the 
love-letters she had re- 
ceived in a bag, for 
the purpose of produc- ^d 
ing them in court, — jg 
when, sad to relate, 5^ 
their own natural 5= 
warmth caused sponta- 
neous combustion, and 
ashes alone remained. „ 

This is net gain," ^g^^ ^^^J^ ^^*" 
as the lean spider said ->^ ^^ ^ ^ -^^ 
to the fat fly. From the sublimo to tho ridiculous. 




" (Hie) 'Tilda, I begin to (hie) think valking is gettin duberous along 
here, (hie) but never mind, so long as yer happy, (hie.) 



"La! Mr. Bullfinch, 
you are so insinuating 
\ he re's no refusing 
you any thing." 

" Give us your hand, 
then." 

" No, I thank you ; 
but there's my foot." 




" Don't kiss me, Mr. 
Pug, I tell you !" 

11 Dear me ! Miss 
Waspwaist, I never 
thought of doing such 
a thing." " Well, sir, you'd better not ; for if you do, you'll get kissed 
yourself— that I will, you impudent fellow !" 



" I'm playing upon my musical instru- 
ment," as the chap said when he pulled 
the pig's tail. 

People often speak of love and mar- 
riage, bat never speak of marriage and 
love. That is right, love always has the 
precedence. 

Military Tactics. — « 'Tintioa !? ex- 
claimed an Irish sergeant to his platoon ; 
" front face, and 'tind to the rowl call ! 
As many o' ye as is prisent 'ill say ' here,' 
and as many o' ye as is not prisent, 'ill p m a reg'lar screamer at 
say ' absint,' sure !" the musician business! 




f®5 



6. •ffUN^. 



Begins on Wednesday, 30 days. 



1§42. 



moon's PHASES. 

D. H. M. 

Third Gtuarter, 1 1 55 M. 

New Moon, 8 5 18 E. 

First Gtuarter, 15 11 56 M. 

Full Moon, 22 4 26 E. 

Third Quarter, 30 6 44 E. 



g.3 . 

rt 2 a 



-i« 



Days. 



74 



2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
1? 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



d. Various Phenomena* 



Nicomede. Warm 4 

% south 2 53. 4 

6 wi£A 4 

$ sets 9 16. 4 

B 2d Sunday after Trinity. 4 

2 showers, i 

3 Arcturus south 9 4. 4 
4® runs high. 1 

5 Growing weather. 4 

6 [gr. elong. 4 
St. Barnabas. <§) &. 5's 

in perigee, 
h south 1 30. 



m 

Ri. 

H. M. 



Quite hot. 
8 33. 



4 Arcturus sou 

5 *2 south 1 53. 

6 St. Alban. ilfor^ 

7 9 sets 9 27. 

□ J#. showers 

Dr. Belknap died 1798. 
ent. o- ® runs low. 

sultry. 
St. John Bapt. 5 stat. 7 
(5 ID J 1 . Frequent 

5th Sunday after Trinity. 
9 sets 9 28. 
j$) in apogee. 

St. Peter. showers 
\l south 18. 



m I ®'s 

Sets.dec.N 

H. M, O 



7 22 

7 22 

7 23 

7 23 

7 24 

24 

25 

25 

25 

26 

26 

26 

27 

7 2' 

7 27 

27 

27 

28 

i 28 

28 

7 28 

7 28 

7 28 

7 28 

7 28 

27 

2" 

27 

2' 

2 



22 4 
22 12 
22 20 
22 27 
22 34 
22 40 
22 46 
22 52 

22 5' 

23 ! 
23 
23 
23 
23 



pla. 



6 

10 
14 
] 

23 20 

23 



24 



23 21 
23 27 
23 2C 
23 25 
23 2; 
23 21 
23 18 
23 15 
23 12 



28 

T 

22 

a 

18 

n 

15 
29 

53 
27 

SI 

26 

m 

25 

23 

m 

20 

16 
29 
VJ 
21 

13 

30 

24 

T 



Rises 



South 

H. M 



High 
water 

H. M. 



19 

40 

1 2 
1 26 

1 53 

2 25 

3 4 
sets. 

8 35 

9 21 
10 4 

10 38 

11 8 
11 35 
morn 

1 
2>> 

58 

1 32 

2 12 
2 59 

rises 

8 29 

9 1 
9 31 
9 59 

10 22 

10 44 

11 5 
It 



6 11 

6 51 

7 32 

8 15 

9 1 
9 51 

10 46 

11 44 
ev. 45 

1 45 

2 43 

3 38 



2 

3 
3 59 
5 

5 59 

6 56 

7 44 

8 32 

18 



4 30 

5 20 

6 9 

6 58 

7 4' 

8 39 

9 33 
10 >2[) 
11 
morn 

19 

1 10 

1 59 

2 44 

3 26 

4 7 
4 47 



9 
10 2 

10 46 

11 33 
morn 

20 

1 11 

2 7 

3 

4 3 

5 13 

6 30 

7 33 

8 25 

9 9 
9 49 

10 26 

11 1 
11 35 
ev. 9 

47 

1 25 




7. JULY. 



Begins on Friday, 31 days. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES, 

D. H. M. 

New Moon, 8 2 5 M. 

First auarter, 14 5 9 E. 

Full Moon, 22 6 1 M. 

Third quarter, 30 9 40 M. 



5.2 



T3 S 






Days. 



o» 



8 



D. 


D. 


M. 


VV. 


1 


G 


2 


7 


3 


B 


4 


2 


5 


3 


6 


4 


7 


5 


8 


6 


9 


7 


10 


B 


n 


2 


12 


3 


13 


4 


14 


5 


15 


6 


it; 


7 


17 


B 


18 


2 


1!) 


3 


20 


4 


21 


5 


22 


G 


•23 


7 


24 


B 


25 


2 


26 


3 


27 


4 


28 


5 


29 


6 


30 


7 


31 


B 



Various Phenomena. 



% south 47. 
Visitation B. V. Mary. 
<P © h- Jtfstat. 
Independence. 

1?0£ #?td dry. 
© runs high. 
\l south. 11 44. 
Inferior c5 ® 5- ® 8- 
Antares sou. 9 9. 
8 ® %• ©in per. 

7J. south 11 53. 
2 sets 9 19. 

Fr. Rev. commenced 1789. 
increasing 
Yl south 11 6. 
8th Sunday after Trinity. 
Antares sou. 8 34. 
5 stat. © runs low. 
Margaret. Thunder 

© 8- showers. 

Magdalen. Fresh 

® enters &. g-ates. 

9th Sunday after Trinity, 
St. James. © in apogee. 
St. Anne. Sultry. 

% south 10 46. 
7 ^'s rise 11 41. 
5's gr. elongation. 
Perm died 1718. 
10th Sunday after Trinity. 



Ri 

H. M. 



Sets 

H. M 



<2> 

dec.N 



23 
23 4 

22 59 
22 54 
22 48 
22 43 
22 3G 
22 30 
22 23 
22 15 
22 
21 59 
21 51 
21 42 
21 33 
21 23 
21 13 
21 3 
20 52 
20 41 
20 30 
20 18 
20 6 
19 53 
19 40 
19 27 
19 14 
19 
18 46 
18 32 
18 17 



pla. 



Rises 



II 52 

morn 

21 

5G 

1 40 

2 33 

3 37 
sets. 

8 37 

9 9 
9 38 

10 

10 32 

11 1 
11 34 
morn 

12 

5G 

1 47 

2 44 

3 46 
rises 

8 2 
8 26 

8 48 

9 9 
9 31 
9 55 

10 21 

10 53 

11 31 



Sou. 

H. M 



6 9 

6 53 

7 41 

8 3-2 

9 28 

10 28 

11 29 
ev.30 



1 
2 
3 
4 
4 
5 

6 3G 

7 29 
8 
9 18 

10 12 

11 4 
11 54 
morn 

40 

1 9,n 
2 

2 45 

3 24 

4 5 

4 47 

5 32 

6 21 



High 
water 



2 
48 
44 
59 
13 
18 
14 

5 
51 

10 37 

11 22 
morn 

5 

50 

1 36 

2 20 

3 22 

4 43 

6 9 

7 19 

8 13 

8 58 

9 37 
10 9 

10 40 

11 10 
11 41 
ev. 11 

45 

1 20 
1 59 




Declaration of Independence. 




Concerts a la musard, driving 1 out the regular drama. 



Before the death of Caesar, " ghosts did squeak and gibber in the 
Roman streets." Thus squeaked the fiddle, and the trumpet quavered 
at the Drama's doom. 




"You see, my darter vears her hair like the Queen ; consekently I 
should vish her to be taken as sich." 

" Wery, madam, 'pon honor — a fact similar } >pon honor." 

" Mrs. Periwinkle, do you know that my darter has a strong 'sem- 
blance to the Queen Wictory V 

" La ! no — you don't say so .' What is it V 

" Why, don't you know the Queen is weak in her ankles, and so is 
my darter." 

" Bless me, Mrs. Periwinkle, then my Peggy can bra:: of something 
like it too; for she's got a hontrageous great fever sore on her lei; 




" Would you like it curled, sirl" 

" Eh-eh-eh — why, yes, certainly. A-a-a most infernal hard brush 



yours ! 



" Mother, what vulgar creachures those sailors am ! One of them 
came along the road the other day, and asked Mrs. Tipsnuff for some- 
thing to eat. She let down the bars and turned him into the barn, where 
was a peck of good oats, but he positively did not know the way to the 
manger, and went off without tasting his food. Poor thing! he was 
more ignorant than a cow. 



8, AUGUST. 



Begins on Monday, 31 days. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES, 

D. H. M. 

New Moon, 6 9 49 M. 

First Quarter, 13 26 M. 

Full Moon, 20 9 18 E. 

Third Quarter, 28 10 53 E. 



§.2 - 


o 


T*H 


cc 


CO 


6 


kfl 


CO | 




-^ 


— < 


CO 


m 


ifi 


o 


«3 a 


CO 


kQ 


o 


T* 


^ 


^ 


F-« 


SS J-i 
















M l* 


o 


o 


o 

OS 


o 


Q 
IS 


CM 


o 
in 


Days. 



Various Phenomena. 



Heat 



contin- 
ues 



Lammas day. Look 

(JD runs high. for 

9 sets 8 54. raitt. 

Vega south 10 7. <D J$ 
7J. south 10 7. 
Transfiguration. 
<$) in perigee. 
7 # ; s rise 10 58. 
h south 9 25. 
St. Lawrence. 
% sets 2 22. 
George IV. bom 1762. 
Gtueen Adelaide born 1792. 
12th Sunday after%rinity. 
® runs low. Quite 

Choc. mis. est. 1818, 
_ S2. 6®% dry. 

% south 9 11. 
*2 south 8 44. 

Cooling breezes. 
13th Sunday after "Trinity. 
§) in apogee. 

® enters r^. Sup. 6 ® $. 
St. Bartholomew. 

Perhaps rain. 
Dr. Adam Clarke died 1832. 
Dr. Herschel died 1822. 
St. Augustine. 
St. John Baptist beheaded. 
(D runs high. 
7 *'s rise 9 27. 



m 

Ri. 

H. M. 



Sets 

H. M< 



1 



59 

5S 

5 

6 56 

6 54 

6 53 

6 52 

6 51 

6 50 

6 49 

47 

46 

45 

44 

43 

6 41 

6 40 

6 39 

6 38 

6 36 

6 35 

6 34 

6 33 

6 31 

6 30 



dec.N pla. 



18 2 
17 47 
17 31 
17 15 
16 59 
16 43 
16 26 
16 9 
15 52 
15 35 
15 17 
14 59 
14 41 
14 22 
14 4 
13 45 
13 26 
13 7 
12 47 
12 27 
12 7 
U 47 
11 27 
11 7 
10 46 
10 25 
10 4 



Rises 

H. M 



morn 

18 

1 16 

2 21 

3 39 
sets. 

7 37 

8 6 

8 34 

9 3 
9 35 

10 12 

10 55 

11 14 
morn 

39 

1 3i I 

2 41 

3 43 

4 44 
rises. 

7 15 
7 37 

7 5!> 

8 25 

8 54 

9 28 

10 11 

11 8 
morn 

4 



® 
Sou. 

H. M 



7 14 

8 11 

9 10 

10 11 

11 11 
ev. 8 

1 3 

1 56 

2 48 

3 39 

4 31 

5 25 

6 19 

7 14 
8 
9 
9 51 

10 37 

11 2] 
morn 

3 
44 

i ai 

2 4 

2 45 

3 29 

4 15 

5 5 

5 59 

6 56 

7 54 



High 
water 



2 58 

4 18 

5 44 

6 58 

7 57 

8 51 

9 37 

10 22 

11 3 
11 41 
morn 

23 

1 6 

1 56 

2 57 

4 23 

5 54 
7 9 

7 59 

8 42 

9 16 
9 48 

10 15 

10 42 

11 8 
11 38 
ev. 8 

47 

1 39 

2 30 

3 54 




nm- 



Xaast of Dog- Days. 



9. 


SEPTEMBER. Begins on Thursday, 30 


days. 




1842. 


" 


co 


to 1- 


UO 


00 




- fl 


be ^ ^ 







7^ 




CO 




XTCOON'S PHASES. 


*J . 


fl 


















_h3 g 


3 OS GO 


r- 





<4< 


CO 


— < 





D. H. M. 




*£5 





*n 








in 


New Moon, 4 5 19 E. £ 5 . 



















First Quarter, 11 11 2 M. 


~gn 


2 - 
















i?nll Mnnn 1Q 1 ^8 I? 




















Third Quarter, 27 10 9 M. 1 


Days. 


M kO 


Ci 


TO 




5* 


88 


5* 








m 


<D 


<3>'s 


€) 


® 


® 


High 


D 


D. 


Various Phenomena. 


Ri. 


Sets. dec.N 


pla. 


Rises 


South 


water 


M. 


W. 




H. M. 


H. M, 


/ 




H. M. 


H. M. 


u. 


M. 


1 


5 


i§) g. Qwite cool. 


5 31 


6 29 


8 17 


ST 


1 14 


8 53 


5 25 


•2 


6 


London burnt 1666, 0. S. 


5 33 


6 27 


7 55 


& 


2 29 


9 51 


6 42 


3 


7 


% south 8 5. High 


5 34 


6 26 


7 33 


3 47 


10 46 


7 43 


4 


B 


<§) in per. tfid^s. 


5 3£ 


>6 25 


7 11 


W 


sets. 


11 41 


8 33 


5 


2 


Fomalhaut sou. 11 49. 


5 36 


6 24 


6 49 


24 


6 32 


ev. 34 


9 19 


G 


3 


La Fayette born 1757. 


5 3£ 


6 22 


6 26 


.TV. 


7 2 


1 27 


9 58 


7 


4 


9 sets 7 59. Look 


5 3S 


6 21 


6 4 


24 


7 34 


2 20 


10 37 


8 


5 


Nativity B. V. Mary. 


5 4C 


6 20 


5 41 


m 


8 10 


3 15 


11 17 


9 


6 


% stationary. for 


5 42 


6 18 


5 19 


23 


8 51 


4 11 


11 59 


10 


7 


Erie battle 1813. rain. 


5 43 


6 17 


4 56 


t 


9 39 


5 8 


morn 


11 


B 


Vi stationary. flg) runs low. 


5 44 


6 16 


4 33 


19 


10 34 


6 3 


44 


12 


2 


More 


5 4(j 


6 14 


4 10 


VI 


11 33 


6 57 


1 33 


13 


3 


® &• rain. 


5 4^/ 


6 13 


3 47 


15 


morn 


7 48 


2 32 


14 


4 


Moscow burnt 1812. 


5 48 


6 12 


3 24 


27 


34 


8 35 


3 57 


15 


5 


Surrender of N. Y. 1776. 


5 50 


6 10 


3 1 


*w 


1 36 


9 20 


5 24 


16 


6 


% south 7 14. 


5 51 


6 9 


2 38 


20 


2 37 


10 2 


6 43 


n 


7 


Lambert. Cloudy. 


5 52 


6 8 


2 15 


^ 


3 37 


10 43 


7 38 


IK 


B 


® in apogee. 


5 54 


6 6 


1 52 


14 


4 36 


11 23 


8 15 


19 


o 


£ ft. Quite 


5 55 


6 5 


1 28 


26 


rises. 


morn 


8 52 


20 


3 


cold 


5 56 


6 4 


1 5 


T 


6 5 


3 


9 20 


21 


4 


St. Matthew. winds. 


5 58 


6 2 


42 


20 


6 30 


44 


9 44 


22 


5 


J# south 11 41. 


5 59 


6 1 


N. 18 


H 


6 58 


1 27 


10 10 


2;, 


6 


<2) enters £i=. L00& 


6 


6 


S. 5 


14 


7 30 


2 13 


10 38 


24 


7 


for 


6 2 


5 58 


29 


27 


8 10 


3 1 


11 8 


25 


B 


18th Sunday after Trinity. 


6 3 


5 57 


52 


n 


8 57 


3 53 


11 45 


26 


2 


® runs high. rain.. 


(> 4 


5 56 


1 15 


22 


9 53 


4 48 


ev.24 


27 


•-> 


Fomalhaut south 10 23. 


6 6 


5 54 


1 39 


51? 


10 58 


5 44 


1 11 


28 


4 


® 2$ . Blustering 


6 7 


5 53 


2 2 


19 


morn 


6 41 


2 10 


29 


5 


St. Michael. 


6 8 


5 52 


2 26 $1 


8 


7 37 


3 32 


'M) 


6 


St. Jerome. winds. 


6 10 


5 50 


2 491 


18 


1 


22 


8 31 


5 


6 





" Murder ! you can't come in ! Mr. Cox, consider — help — oh ! you 
wretch! Fire! Fire!" 

A young spark going in suddenly upon several girls who were manu- 
facturing some fashionable article of dress, they were thrown into a 

flurry, and hastened to 
put it out of sight. — 
44 Don't be alarmed, 
young ladies. What*! 
the matter ?" said lie. 
44 Oh ! nothing sir ! wo 
were only making a lit- 
tle bustle on your sud- 
den appearance." 



A Yankee Bull— A 
Yankee in Brighton is 

said to have thus written 
to his friend in London : 
44 It was so tarnation, 

unheard-of cold yester- 
day morning at Brigh- 
ton, that when I took 
my kettle off tho fire to 
my tea, the boiling wa- 
ter in it was actually 
froze. 

It's all in my rye. as 

the poodle said to the 

thread. 




1176 versus 1842. 
44 Huzza for old 1776 !" 
44 Silence, you rogue — 1842 is older than 1776." 




" Pray, young gentlemen, pity the ! poor blind man.' " " If you are 
blind, how d'ye know that we are young gentlemen V 1 "Oh! I beg 
pardon! I meant the poor deaf and dumb." 



" Zeke, come tell us what you intends to try yer 'and at now. You've 
guv up the lock-picking, and you've got tired of takin' horse-shoes wid 
hoofs attached; how can yer turn yer 'and for an honest livin' now?" 

" Vhy, Ben, I'se been preponderate' in my mind, and about half con- 
cludes to become a desarving object. Them desarving objects picks up 
a good deal of loose change in course of a year. But a man arns his 
bread at that, like every thing else. You has to ax so many wot don't 
know how to 'predate yer labors, and it costs so much to keep yer clothes 
out of repair, and yer foot lame, and yer hize red, that it's quite labo^us.'* 




c< Oh ! preserve me !" 

" No fear of that, Jack— if salt and water won't preserve you, nothing 
would." 




" I'll tell you wot it is, Mr. Brown, if you don't send home my hus- 
band's breeches that you borrowed, I shall expose yer." 
" And if 1 do, my good oman, I shall be afiher exposing myself." 

A wag having hungup the carcase of a stale fish before a lawyer's 
office, the lawyer always twitted him about it when they met. OftCC 
he said to him — " You rascal, I ought to have flung the old carcase at 
your head !" 

"You are always flinging it in my teeth, and that is worse," said 
the wag. 

A Confession. — A young convert in the country, recently got ttp and 
was making confession somewhat after this sort, viz:— "J have been 
very wicked, indeed I have; I have cheated many persons, very many ; 
but I will restore four fold;" when he was interrupted by an old lady 
thus — " Well, I should think before you confess much you had better 
marry Nancy Stebbins, as you agreed to 1" 




Charity in olden times. 

" A trifle, may it please you, just to pay my way to the next town." 
" Here are a few guineas for your use. Stop at the mansion as you 
pass, and get something warm." 



" Oh, good 
sir, if you 
would but let 
me have one 
penny to get 
some potatees 
for the chiU 
ders." 

" Have you 
read the hact, 
woman 1 have 
you read the 
hact, by which 
vagrants are 
sentenced to the 
pillory 1 If I 
wasn't a wery 
charitable gen- 
tleman, I would 
have you all 
whipped." 




Charity about these 'ere times. 



A live specimen. — A covey came into a tavern in New- York, when I 
was last in that city. He was dressed in five jackets, all of which failed 
to conceal his raggedness; and as he bolted in he exclaimed, — " Worse 
than I look, by a link or two. But no matter; I've let myself for four- 
teen dollars a month, and find my own prog and lodging." " To do 
what," said the bar-keeper. " To stand at the corner for a paper-mill 
sign — { cash for rags' — that's all. I'm about to enter upon the stationary 
business, you see." He tossed off his grog, and bustled out to begin his 
day's work. Western Sketches. 



1G. OCTOBER. Begins on Saturday, 31 days. 



1§42. 



MOON'S FHASES, 

D. H. M. 

New Moon, 4 1 28 M. 

First Quarter, 11 1 45 M. 

Full Moon, 19 6 16 M. 

Third Ctuarter, 26 7 45 E. 





© 


eg 


tt (Z 


ee 


-~ 


-ai 


gj . 


^ 


SI 


"" 


i—i 


N 


rr 


~~ 


S3 t~ 


35 


r» 


f« 


cc 


ura 


— 


^ 


«* 


^ 


rr 


rr- 


-r 


T 


TT 


»I- 


^ 


o 


cT 


2 


l- 


B* 


Ifi 

51 


Days. 



Various Phenomena. 



□ © h> Mornings 

Andre executed 1780. 

% in perigee. cool. 

7 ^'s south 2 48. 

Brainarddied 1747. 

$ south 10 44. 

Q ® 7J.. Wind* 

9's gr. elon. 5' s £ r * e * on - 

Q) runs low. 

Bahamas discovered 1492. 

Perhaps 
7 #'s south 2 12. 

frost. 
_ in apogee. 
21st Sunday after Trinity. 
9 sets 7 13. .Fine 

St. Luke. weather. 

Cornwallls surren. 1781. 
5 stationary. 
7 sfc's south 1 41. 

Frosty 

G) enters Hi. ® runs high. 

and cold 

JJ. ^ ^ 

mornings. 

[Great fire Newark 1836. 

Sts. Simon and Jude. 

9 sets 7 4. 

23d Sunday after Trinity. 
Inf. (3 <g> 5- © in per. 



Ri. 

H.M, 



Set 

H. Itf. 



<2> 

dec.S 



12 
36 

5!) 
22 
45 
9 
3'2 
56 

i: 

40 

3 

26 

7 48 

8 11 
8 33 

8 55 

9 1 
9 39 

10 1 
10 22 

10 44 

11 5 
11 26 

11 47 

12 8 
12 29 

12 49 

13 9 
13 21) 

13 49 

14 9 



pla. 



Rises 

If. M. 



2 38 

3 55 

5 11 
sets. 

6 4 

6 44 

7 31 

8 24 

9 23 

10 25 

11 28 
mom 

29 

1 30 

2 29 

3 26 

4 21 

5 96 
rises 

5 33 

6 11 

6 56 

7 49 

8 50 

9 58 
11 8 
morn 

21 

1 31 

2 4N 
4 2 



Sou. 



9 25 

10 1? 

11 10 
ev. 4 



1 

i 5: 

2 5: 

3 53 

4 4D 

5 49 

6 31 

7 17 

8 0| 

8 42 

9 2: 

10 2 
io 43 

11 2G 
morn 

ll 

51) 

1 50 
9 4 1 

3 3!) 

4 36 

5 30 

6 23 

7 15 

8 a 

8 fi 

!) 49 



High 
water 

H. M. 



6 24 

7 20 

8 8 

8 53 

9 32 
10 14 

10 56 

11 38 
morn 

29 

1 9 

2 9 

3 90 

4 49 
6 

6 57 

7 40 

8 11 

8 46 

9 14 
9 43 

10 14 

10 4!) 

11 27 
ev. 10 

57 

1 58 

3 19 

4 3D 

5 55 

6 50 




Fall Races. 




Up to SNTXTF, or the LAST PINCH. 

" You'll find a pinch of this a very odorous affair, my man." 
" Yis, your honor, wery dolorous indeed, in." 



11. NOVJ3MBEI&. Begins on Tuesday, 30 days. 



1842. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

D. H. M. 

New Moon, 2 11 12 M. 

First Quarter, 9 8 19 E. 

Full Moon, 17 10 33 E. 

Third Quarter, 25 4 3 M. 






ui 



gs 



Days. 



D. 


D. 


M. 


W. 


1 


3 


2 


4 


3 


5 


4 


6 


5 


7 


6 


B 


7 


2 


8 


3 


9 


4 


10 


5 


11 


6 


12 


7 


13 


B 


14 


2 


15 


3 


16 


4 


17 


5 


18 


6 


19 


7 


20 


B 


21 


2 


22 


3 


23 


4 


24 


5 


25 


6 


26 


7 


27 


B 


28 


2 


29 


3 


30 


4 



Various Phenomena. 



Ri. 

H. M. 



Sets. 

U. M 



dec.S 



pla 



Rises 

H. M 



South 

H. M. 



High 
water 

H. M. 



Blus- 
tering 
and 
cold winds 
% runs low, 



All Saints. 
All Souls. 
9 sets 7 0. 

P. plot, 1605. 

24th Sunday after Trinity. 

, 7 *'s south 34. 
% sets 8 47. 

5 stationary. Look 

Milton died 1674. for 

St. Martin. some 

_ in apogee. rain. 

25th Sunday after Trinity. 
High winds. 
Witherspoon died 1794. 
5 's gr. elongation. 
7 #»s south 11 51. 
T7 sets 7 37. 

runs high. More 

26th Sunday after Trinity. 



6 51 
6 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 
6 57 
6 58 



® ent. I . St, Cecelia. 
St. Clement. 
7 =fc's south 11 23. 
New-York evacuated 1783. 
Perhaps rain. 
Advent. ® in per. 
9 stationary. 
prises 2 28. 
St. Andrew. 



9 

10 
11 
124 
13 
14 
15 



14 28 

14 47 

15 6 
15 25 

15 43 

16 1 
16 19 
16 37 

16 54 

17 11 
17 28 

17 44 

18 
18 16 
18 32 

18 47 

19 2 
19 16 
19 30 
19 44 

19 57 

20 10 
20 23 
20 35 
20 47 

20 59 

21 10 
21 21 
21 31 
21 41 



5 19 

sets 

5 19 

6 10 

7 9 

8 11 

9 15 

10 18 

11 20 
morn 

19 



10 42 

11 39 
ev. 3' 



rises. 

5 44 

6 44 

7 50 
9 

10 11 

11 23 
mom 

34 

1 46 

2 59 

4 1 

5 27 



9 21 
10 6 

10 53 

11 44 

morn 

38 



34 

30 
26 
20 
11 
1 
51 
40 

8 31 

9 25 
10 21 



7 40 

8 29 

9 14 
9 58 

10 39 

11 22 
morn 

3 

48 

1 38 

2 39 

3 48 

4 54 

5 56 

6 49 

7 29 

8 6 

8 41 

9 19 
9 57 

10 35 

11 18 
ev. 2 

55 

1 51 

2 54 

4 4 

5 14 

6 18 

7 16 




12. DECEMBER. Begins on Thursday, 31 days. 



I§42. 



liXECON'S PHASES. 

D. H. M. 

New Moon, 1 11 19 E. 

First auarter, 9 5 28 E. 

Full Moon, 17 1 50 E. 

Third Uuarter, 24 11 49 M. 

New Moon, 31 2 6 E. 






Days. 



c^ 



Various Phenomena. 



Fair and mild. 
runs low. 
Ell-and-yard south 42. 
}& stationary. ® SJ 

Very fine 
Diet of Worms, 1540. 
% sets 7 20. 

wholesome weather 
Milton born 1608. 
_ in apogee. 
3d Sunday in Advent. 

Cloudy and 
Lucy. may rain. 

Washington died 1799. 

[1835. 
D €> J#. Great fire N. Y. 
runs high. 



Inferior 6 © 9 



St. Thomas. 

in perigee. 
J* rises 2 5. 

Christmas. 
St. Stephen. 
St. John. 



8- 

Cold 
winds 
© ent. VS- 



Very pleasant 

for 

"the 

season. 



Innocents. Sup. c5 © 5- 
runs low. Think 

9 rises 5 53. of 

S2- the poor. 



Ri. 

H. M. 



Set. 

It. M. 



39 
39 
38 
37 
37 
36 
36 
35 
35 
35 
34 
34 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
33 
33 
33 
4 33 
4 33 
4 34 



dec.S 



pla. 



Sets. 

H. M 



sets. 



4 

5 

6 

8 

9 

10 
11 
morn 

5 



1 4 

2 3 

3 4 

4 7 

5 11 

6 14 
rises 

5 3: 

6 48 

8 1 

9 14 

10 26 

11 37 
morn 

49 

2 1 

3 13 

4 24 

5 30 

6 30 
sets. I 



Sou. 

H. M 



11 19 

ev.18 



10 27 

11 23 
morn 

21 



59 
4* 
38 
27 
19 

8 12 

9 

10 6 

11 3 
11 59 



High 
water 

H. M. 

8 11 

9 1 
9 44 

10 25 

11 6 
11 43 
morn 

23 

1 4 



8 18 

9 3 
9 45 

10 28 

11 10 
11 53 
ev.37 



29 
20 
16 
30 
53 
3 
2 
50 




Times Sxit. Finale in 1842. 




ALL MYNACK 



Published at 107 John Street, and 
18 Division Street. 



■ ■ 

■ ■ 

■ ■■ 
■ 

■ ■■ 

■ ■■ 

1 


• - — 


. 2. 


»-* . r-»- wm> •» PI 


M» fl* « L it 6#